Picturing Machines 1400--1700 (Transformations: Studies in the History of Science and Technology)


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They do so through detailed investigations of specific images, looking at over that range from sketches to perspective views to thoroughly constructed projections. Free download. Book file PDF easily for everyone and every device. This Book have some digital formats such us :paperbook, ebook, kindle, epub, fb2 and another formats.

Picturing Machines by MIT Press Ltd Hardback, for sale online eBay An increasing number of scholars have begun to see science and technology as relevant issues in International Relations IR , acknowledging the impact of material elements, technical instruments, and scientific practices on international security, statehood, and global governance. Bibliography - Art, Science,Technology. Wicked Games.

See a Problem? Take It Easy. Dealing with a topic that relates to the history of both science and technology, the volume could not have found better company. Like machines, to actually come into being, books need to be not only designed written but also manufactured. My thanks go therefore to Angelika Irmscher, Heinz Reddner, and Susan Richter, who assisted in the editorial work and helped to bring the manuscript with all the figures to its final camera-ready form. Finally, I want to thank Sara Meirowitz, responsible for the science, technology, and society books at the MIT Press, who discreetly and reliably provided every support needed.

Only a small fraction of them are technical drawings and thus subjects for this book. However, despite this concentration, the number of drawings addressed here is still huge. The unsatisfactory vagueness of such guesses results from the fact that nobody knows how many such drawings might be buried in such locations as the archives of states, cities, dioceses, monasteries, and princely families, and in the manuscript departments of libraries and museums.

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The bulk of this material consists in presentational drawings that were published in booklets and books—manuscript books Bilderhandschriften as well as printed ones—in the early modern period. This fact can certainly be explained by the assumption that drawings of the design and construction process of technical artifacts were not kept but thrown away after a certain span of time. For a first orientation, table 1. The prevalence of the presentational over the workshop material among the extant engineering drawings poses a serious problem to our enterprise.

For a picture of the actual role technical drawings played in the practice of engineers and architects, workshop drawings are naturally of far more significance than the presentational ones. The latter may be telling in this respect as well. Which role was assigned to the medium of drawing by early modern engineers themselves? This is true for the drawings considered here as well as for three-dimensional models of machines. I am grateful to the participants for their commentaries and suggestions, in particular for the extensive discussion by Pamela O.

For the related topic of the visual representation of the trajectories of projectiles, see Biittner et al. For the early modem employment of scaled-down models of machines, see Popplow in press. Studies of machine elements. It remains unclear whether the drawing documents thought experiments or objects actually assembled in the workshop.

Drawing by Leonardo da Vinci. The aim of this chapter is to work out a classification of the contexts in which early modern machine drawings were employed.


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Others have been interpreted as didactic means of conveying his tremendous knowledge on the behavior of machine elements to others, and some obviously served theoretical functions. Of course, such a classification does not exclude Figure 1. Detail of machine for weaving braids. Codex Atlanticus, fol. However, it is hard to imagine that the numerous fifteenth-century manuscript machine books could have been produced without any foundation in some less formalized practice. Scattered textual evidence that still awaits closer investigation indeed testifies to a more informal employment of machine drawings as early as the beginning of the fifteenth century.

Drawings and later woodcuts and engravings allowed 8 See Leng this volume. See Dohm-van Rossum , See Schofield and Frommel a. Architectural treatises from the fifteenth century onwards often contain explicit discussions of the role of the medium of drawing in the design process.

See Thoenes See Mahoney and Hall , In the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries, these manuscripts contained mostly military devices. Well-known examples are the manuscripts assembled by Guido da Vigevano c. The first pioneering manuscripts showing engines for civil purposes were composed in Italy, again, by Mariano Taccola c.

While large devices for military and civil purposes had existed only rather vaguely in the visual memory of medieval contemporaries, this situation now changed, at least for those among whom these manuscripts circulated. With the regard to the works of Konrad Kyeser, Mariano Taccola, and Francesco di Giorgio Martini, some dozens or even hundreds of copies of the original manuscripts have been discovered.

They still await closer investigation concerning the questions of who commissioned them and who was responsible for the artistic process of producing the manuscript copies. In addition to the printed Theatres of Machines, a number of manuscripts have been preserved, which very likely document a preparatory stage of publication. Late medieval and early modern machine books all have a comparable structure: Full-page images of technical devices are each accompanied by a more or less detailed text explaining their general features.

While these explanations often consist only of a few lines in the early manuscripts—in some cases, there are no textual explanations at all—in sixteenth-century works, the length of the explanatory texts grew considerably.

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Drawing Mechanics

This is especially true for the printed machine books. It is well possible that some authors of the earlier manuscripts assumed that the inspection of their manuscripts would be accompanied by oral explanations. For the manuscripts of Konrad Kyeser, see Friedrich High-quality drawing of a dredger with didactic implications.

Note the details of the mechanism drawn separately below. Drawing by Cosimo Bartoli, c. Presentation of pumps in a printed machine book. Caus , fol. However, the perspective techniques now had become more refined. Other graphic techniques like horizontal or vertical sections or ground plans, more difficult to read for the lay spectator, are found only rarely in printed machine books for a late exception, see figure 1.

It has often been stressed that representational manuscripts and printed machine books mirrored technical reality only to a very limited extent. Over time, however, this interpretation has changed considerably.


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  7. In earlier research it was sometimes argued that the authors of these books did not yet dispose of modem exactness in their technological descriptions. Indeed, authors of the printed machine books often stressed that the designs they presented also were to inspire their colleagues to try out ever new combinations of machine elements to improve traditional machine technology and to extend its fields of application. Vertical section of machine elements of the pr i nce ly commissioners and promote water-lifting device shown in figure 4.

    This new kind of knowledge distinguished the engineer from the ordinary artisan and thus underlined the legitimacy of claims to higher social status of these technical experts. The materiality of technology was often ignored in these presentational treatises.


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    The organizational activities of the engineer on the building site were mentioned as scarcely as materials, measurements or gear ratios— it was considered self-evident that such factors had to be established at a later point 19 See Popplow b. However, illustrations of machines were often incorporated in lively landscapes or workshop scenarios to suggest the possibility of immediate employment.

    Information on the process of creating illustrations for presentational treatises is scarce. The selection of these artists and how they were instructed about which devices they had to illustrate, and how and with which technical details, remains unclear. This is also true for the woodcuts and engravings in the later printed works. His letters show that he had to send different artists to the mining centres of Saxony several times until he found one who produced drawings of the machines employed there in a quality sufficient to serve as templates for the woodcuts. From early fifteenth-century Basle, such a plan has been preserved with a coloured scheme of the different waterworks crossing the town.

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    It is assembled of pieces of parchment and is, in total, nearly ten meters long. It shows a device that had been built a short time earlier by the carpenter Johannes Kretzmaier, probably under supervision of Schickhardt himself, to provide the castle of Hellenstein near Heidenheim with water figure 1. The drawing emphasized only the core element of the transmission machinery: a combination of a lantern and an oval rack. It served to transfer the rotary motion provided by the water-wheel to the reciprocating motion of the horizontal beam driving the piston rods of the pumps.

    The lower part 21 See Kessler-Slotta Commented presentational drawing of the pumps supplying Hellenstein castle. Drawing by Heinrich Schickhardt, or after. While the former was responsible for the design and the organization of a given project, the latter carried out the actual work. Communication with the investor especially concerned the preparatory stage of realizing mechanical devices. In some cases, applicants presented a whole set of inventions by means of illustrated manuscripts, which ultimately strongly resembled manuscript machine books. A manuscript composed with quite different intentions, under the supervision of Duke Julius the Younger of Brunswick-Wolfenbiittel around , represents an attempt to employ catalogues of designs of mechanical devices for concrete regional innovations.

    Some of the illustrations had been copied from earlier manuscripts, others show instruments reportedly already employed elsewhere in the duchy, and a few represent inventions allegedly made by Duke Julius himself figure 1. Attempts to turn designs encountered in such manuscripts into practice are, of course, quite conceivable in other cases as well, but they have not yet been documented.

    With the deliberate intention of realization after his death, the unique sketches of mills left behind by Nuremberg patrician Berthold Holzschuher were similarly meant to serve as a guideline to construction, although in a purely pri- vate context. Nevertheless, it seems that his drawings represent an extraordinary case of preservation rather than an extraordinary way of using the medium.

    Thus they most likely testify to standardized practices in early modern engineering. Presentational drawing of a device for stamping and mixing lime allegedly invented by Duke Julius of Brunswick-Wolfenbiittel, c.

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    At Figure 1. Inventory of a paper-mill in Montbeliard. Drawing by Heinrich Schickhardt, c. And indeed, the stamp at the extreme left is marked as obsolete by several diagonal lines. Most probably, a drawing like this was presented to the Duke of Wiirttemberg for his formal approval or to keep him informed about such a costly project.

    Picturing Machines 1400--1700 (Transformations: Studies in the History of Science and Technology) Picturing Machines 1400--1700 (Transformations: Studies in the History of Science and Technology)
    Picturing Machines 1400--1700 (Transformations: Studies in the History of Science and Technology) Picturing Machines 1400--1700 (Transformations: Studies in the History of Science and Technology)
    Picturing Machines 1400--1700 (Transformations: Studies in the History of Science and Technology) Picturing Machines 1400--1700 (Transformations: Studies in the History of Science and Technology)
    Picturing Machines 1400--1700 (Transformations: Studies in the History of Science and Technology) Picturing Machines 1400--1700 (Transformations: Studies in the History of Science and Technology)
    Picturing Machines 1400--1700 (Transformations: Studies in the History of Science and Technology) Picturing Machines 1400--1700 (Transformations: Studies in the History of Science and Technology)
    Picturing Machines 1400--1700 (Transformations: Studies in the History of Science and Technology) Picturing Machines 1400--1700 (Transformations: Studies in the History of Science and Technology)
    Picturing Machines 1400--1700 (Transformations: Studies in the History of Science and Technology) Picturing Machines 1400--1700 (Transformations: Studies in the History of Science and Technology)
    Picturing Machines 1400--1700 (Transformations: Studies in the History of Science and Technology) Picturing Machines 1400--1700 (Transformations: Studies in the History of Science and Technology)

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